I Am just a souvnir is a project by Benjamin Füglister and Martina merten

About the Project

About the Project

I am just a Souvenir is an investigative, journalistic project that examines how ethnically mixed children in the Philippines grow up and what sort of challenges they face. Furthermore it aims to explore how the mothers of these children - who often don’t know the father - deal with the situation. Also it tries to find out what role the catholic church plays when it comes to contraception and sexuell education. Lastly the projects analyses the Welfare situation of children having only one parent.

About the authors

Benjamin Füglister is an artist and cultural entrepreneur born in Switzerland in 1978. He has lived in Berlin, Germany, since completing his studies at the Basel College of Art in Switzerland, and at the Utrecht College of Art in the Netherlands. In his artistic practice he questions social conventions and explores their visual transformations. His particular interest is photography as a medium for visualising the shifts in the human image. Benjamin Füglister has been a member of the European Photography magazine editorial staff since 2006, and in 2009 he established piclet.org, a platform for hand-picked photographic portfolios and directory for photography festivals, magazines and institutions. He is the founder of CAP Prize, the prize for contemporary African photography, tendered for the first time in 2012. Füglister is a nominator for the renowned Prix Pictet, and sits on the Photo Basel artistic advisory board. He regularly works as a reviewer at international photography festivals, such as the European Month of Photography in Vienna or the Houston FotoFest.

Martina Merten works as a specialized journalist and health consultant in Berlin, Germany. Her articles have been published by various trade and consumer publishers [British Medical Journal Group/BMJ; Deutscher Ärzteverlag/Deutsches Ärzteblatt, Springer Medizin Verlag/Ärzte Zeitung, taz Verlags und Vertriebs GmbH/taz, Axel Springer/Welt and Deutsche Welle].

Since March 2014 she works as a correspondent in the Berlin office of the German Medical Daily. From 2005 until 2009 she was filling the position as a social and health editor for the German Medical Journal – the largest specialized Medical Journal (circulation: 400.000) in Germany.

Merten has done on the ground research in more than 16 countries – with a focus on developing countries and emerging nations like China, Philippines, Vietnam, India and Pakistan – most of them thanks to grants of “The European Journalism Center”, “The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting”, “The Kellen Fellowships”, “The International Journalists’ Programmes”, “The Heinz-Kühn Foundation” and “Journalists.Network”.  

Merten assisted to translate and edit a book series of “The International Network Health Policy and Reform” (“Health Policy Developments”), published by the Bertelsmann-Foundation, Gütersloh. Merten also works as a healthcare expert for the German International Cooperation (GIZ) and as a healthcare consultant for various companies in Berlin.

Since 2013 she also teaches global health at the Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics at the Charité University Medical Center, at the CIEE Global Institute Berlin, at the University of Applied Sciences, Idstein and at the University of Applied Sciences, Neu-Ulm.   

Merten holds a Master in political science, constitutional-, social- and economic history and in public international law from Friedrich-Wilhelms University, Bonn.

"I feel incomplete without knowing my father"

"I feel incomplete without knowing my father"

A society with hard to break clerical hierarchies

A society with hard to break clerical hierarchies